Children as young as seven apply basic laws of physics to problem-solving, rather than learning from what has previously been rewarded, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The findings of the study, based on the Aesop’s fable The Crow and the Pitcher, help solve a debate about whether children learning to use tools

The “loudness” of our thoughts—or how we imagine saying something—influences how we judge the loudness of real, external sounds, a team of researchers from NYU Shanghai and NYU has found. Its study, titled “Imagined Speech Influences Perceived Loudness of Sound” and published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, offers new insights into the nature of brain

When and where did humans develop language? To find out, look deep inside caves, suggests an MIT professor. More precisely, some specific features of cave art may provide clues about how our symbolic, multifaceted language capabilities evolved, according to a new paper co-authored by MIT linguist Shigeru Miyagawa. A key to this idea is that cave art

A new online game puts players in the shoes of an aspiring propagandist to give the public a taste of the techniques and motivations behind the spread of disinformation—potentially “inoculating” them against the influence of so-called fake news in the process. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have already shown that briefly exposing people to tactics used

Headphones are a standard sight in gyms and we’ve long known research shows listening to tunes can be a game-changer for your run or workout. Back in 2012, Brunel University London’s Costas Karageorghis likened music to a legal, performance-enhancing drug, cheating tiredness and sparking feel-good vibes. But the precise brain mechanisms music triggers during exercise

There is an optimal point to how much money it takes to make an individual happy, and that amount varies worldwide, according to research from Purdue University. “That might be surprising as what we see on TV and what advertisers tell us we need would indicate that there is no ceiling when it comes to

For decades many people have claimed meditation can change how we behave towards others and make us more compassionate. But now new research has suggested meditation’s role in making individuals better people is limited. The study by scientists at Coventry University in the UK, Massey University in New Zealand, and Radboud University in the Netherlands,

Data from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than five million chess matches suggests that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to a new study by the University of Sheffield. The findings, published in the journal Psychological Science, suggest that female players are not affected by negative

For the first time, scientists have identified the brain pathway that links a positive attitude toward math to achievement in the subject. In a study of elementary school students, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that having a positive attitude about math was connected to better function of the hippocampus, an important

Happiness is not a warm phone, according to a new study exploring the link between adolescent life satisfaction and screen time. Teens whose eyes are habitually glued to their smartphones are markedly unhappier, said study lead author and San Diego State University and professor of psychology Jean M. Twenge. To investigate this link, Twenge, along

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