A team of neuroscientists has found that people are biased toward hearing and producing rhythms composed of simple integer ratios — for example, a series of four beats separated by equal time intervals.Image: MIT News Study finds the brain is biased toward rhythms based on simple integer ratios. When it comes to perceiving music, the

When you’re suddenly able to understand someone despite their thick accent, or finally make out the lyrics of a song, your brain appears to be re-tuning to recognize speech that was previously incomprehensible. University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists have now observed this re-tuning in action by recording directly from the surface of a person’s brain

The saying goes that “your left hand doesn’t know what your right hand is doing,” but actually, your left hand is paying more attention than you’d think. Researchers at Tel-Aviv University found that when people practiced finger movements with their right hand while watching their left hand on 3D virtual reality headsets, they could use

Most people could benefit from a few extra hours of sleep every night. But some people habitually sleep much less than the recommended amount, yet report feeling no ill effects. A new University of Utah study, published Sept. 15 in Brain and Behavior, finds that patterns of neural connections in the brains of so-called “habitual

The location of the ‘physics engine’ in the brain is highlighted in color in this illustration.Credit: Jason Fischer/JHU Whether or not they aced the subject in high school, human beings are physics masters when it comes to understanding and predicting how objects in the world will behave. A Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientist has found

Maintenancce of a robotic hand in the workshop of the DPZ’s Neurobiology Laboratory. Photo: Thomas Steuer Our hands are highly developed grasping organs that are in continuous use. Long before we stir our first cup of coffee in the morning, our hands have executed a multitude of grasps. Directing a pen between our thumb and

Dr. Nancy Puzziferri, assisted by Dr. Atish Chopra, performs bariatric surgery on an obese patient. Dr. Puzziferri led a study in the journal Obesity that found brain activity in severely obese women was different than their lean counterparts. Credit: Image courtesy of UT Southwestern Medical Center The brain’s reward centers in severely obese women continue

The confidence in our decision-making serves to both gauge errors and to revise our approach, New York University neuroscientists have found. Their study offers insights into the hierarchical nature of how we make choices over extended periods of time, ranging from medical diagnoses and treatment to the strategies we use to invest our money. “What

A new Carnegie Mellon University neuroimaging study reveals the mental stages people go through as they are solving challenging math problems. Published in Psychological Science, researchers combined two analytical strategies to use functional MRI (fMRI) to identify patterns of brain activity that aligned with four distinct stages of problem solving. “How students were solving these

A detailed new map by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis lays out the landscape of the cerebral cortex — the outermost layer of the brain and the dominant structure involved in sensory perception and attention, as well as distinctly human functions such as language, tool use and abstract thinking.Credit: Matthew

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