Marmoset monkeys. Credit: © ryanladbrook / Fotolia A baby’s babbles start to sound like speech more quickly if they get frequent vocal feedback from adults. Princeton University researchers have found the same type of feedback speeds the vocal development of infant marmoset monkeys, in the first evidence of such learning in nonhuman primates, researchers report

Poplar plantation. (Stock image) Credit: © Brent / Fotolia Growing plants and then storing the CO2 they have taken up from the atmosphere is no viable option to counteract unmitigated emissions from fossil fuel burning, a new study shows. The plantations would need to be so large, they would eliminate most natural ecosystems or reduce

While showing monkeys videos of social interaction, scientists scanned their brains and tracked their gaze (red dot). Credit: Screen shot from video by C.J. Machado and D. Amaral Scientists call our ability to understand another person’s thoughts — to intuit their desires, read their intentions, and predict their behavior — theory of mind. It’s an

Researchers at UC Riverside are studying the world’s oldest fossil animal, Dickinsonia, to learn more about the evolutionary history of animals. Credit: University of California, Riverside More than 550 million years ago, the oceans were teeming with flat, soft-bodied creatures that fed on microbes and algae and could grow as big as bathmats. Today, researchers

Baby orangutan nursing. Credit: © EBFoto / Fotolia Biomarkers in the teeth of wild orangutans indicate nursing patterns related to food fluctuations in their habitats, which can help guide understanding of breast-feeding evolution in humans, according to a study published today in Science Advances. This work was led by researchers in the Department of Environmental

Tyrannosaurus rex model (stock image). Credit: © Sergio Martínez / Fotolia The giant Tyrannosaurus rex pulverized bones by biting down with forces equaling the weight of three small cars while simultaneously generating world record tooth pressures, according to a new study by a Florida State University-Oklahoma State University research team. In a study published today

In studies of Arabidopsis thaliana, also known as mustard weed, a team of researchers at the University of Delaware found that when a plant has its leaf nicked, it plant sends out an emergency alert to neighboring plants, which begin beefing up their defenses. Credit: Illustration by Jeff Chase/ University of Delaware When Harsh Bais,

Only a few animal species such as New Caledonian crows or some primates have so far been found to habitually use tools. Even fewer can manufacture their own tools. Nevertheless, the Goffin’s cockatoo, an Indonesian parrot, exhibit both abilities while seemingly lacking a genetic adaptation for tool use. Credit: Bene Croy Only a few animal

This is a scanning electron micrograph of the bladder of Utricularia gibba, the humped bladderwort plant (color added). The plant is a voracious carnivore, with its tiny, 1-millimeter-long bladders leveraging vacuum pressure to suck in tiny prey at great speed. Credit: Enrique Ibarra-Laclette, Claudia Anahí Pérez-Torres and Paulina Lozano-Sotomayo. The carnivorous humped bladderwort plant is

Some of the dogs involved in the study of how brain scans may help find the best candidates for service dog training pose in front of an fMRI. Credit: Gregory Berns, Emory University Brain scans of canine candidates to assist people with disabilities can help predict which dogs will fail a rigorous service training program,

Follow Us:

Facebooktwitterrss